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Shakespeare : the invention of the human

Author: Harold Bloom
Publisher: New York : Riverhead Books, 1998.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The author offers an analysis of some of the central work of the Western canon, and of the playwright who not only invented the English language, but who also arguably created human nature as we know it today. Before Shakespeare there was characterization; after Shakespeare, there were characters, men and women capable of change, with highly individual personalities. In this book, the author outlines why Shakespeare  Read more...
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Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bloom, Harold.
Shakespeare.
New York : Riverhead Books, 1998
(OCoLC)656202434
Named Person: William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; Drama; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Harold Bloom
ISBN: 1573221201 9781573221207 157322751X 9781573227513 0965686825 9780965686822
OCLC Number: 39002855
Description: xx, 745 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Chronology --
To the reader --
Shakespeare's universalism --
The early comedies. The Comedy of Errors ; The Taming of The Shrew ; The Two Gentlemen of Verona --
The first histories. Henry VI ; King John ; Richard III --
The apprentice tragedies. Titus Andronicus ; Romeo and Juliet ; Julius Caesar --
The high comedies. Love's Labour's Lost ; A Midsummer Night's Dream ; The Merchant of Venice ; Much Ado About Nothing ; As You Like It ; Twelfth Night --
The major histories. Richard II ; Henry IV ; The Merry Wives of Windsor ; Henry V --
The "problem plays." Troilus and Cressida ; All's Well That Ends Well ; Measure for Measure --
The great tragedies. Hamlet ; Othello ; King Lear ; Macbeth ; Antony and Cleopatra --
Tragic epilogue. Coriolanus ; Timon of Athens --
The late romances. Pericles ; Cymbeline ; The Winter's Tale ; The Tempest ; Henry VIII ; The Two Noble Kinsmen --
Coda : the Shakespearean difference --
A word at the end : foregrounding.
Responsibility: Harold Bloom.

Abstract:

The author offers an analysis of some of the central work of the Western canon, and of the playwright who not only invented the English language, but who also arguably created human nature as we know it today. Before Shakespeare there was characterization; after Shakespeare, there were characters, men and women capable of change, with highly individual personalities. In this book, the author outlines why Shakespeare has remained a popular and universal dramatist for more than four centuries.
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"The most original literary critic in America." --The New York Times "No critic in the English language since Samuel Johnson has been more prolific." --The Paris Review "Bloom is all literature, (he) Read more...

 
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